About your Search

20130115
20130123
STATION
CSPAN2 2
MSNBC 2
MSNBCW 2
CSPAN 1
FBC 1
KGO (ABC) 1
WJLA (ABC) 1
WMAR (ABC) 1
LANGUAGE
English 11
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
? he said i am very familiar with the literature on second-term overreach. we both loved lyndon johnson. i don't think he ever read two words on second-term overreach. probably should have. but the point is that he is very aware of what has gone before and he knows that if you don't read all these books about previous presidents, previous leaders, really in world history, you're limiting yourself to yore own personal experience and that is pretty bad. >> is there a particular president, doris, with whom this president identifies the most or respects the most? >> well, i think when he first came into office, obviously, lincoln mattered a great deal to him. i mean, in part probably because the emancipation proclamation, the end of slavery, and he's the first african-american president, almost like closing that circle. but i think as his term went on he was reading about franklin roosevelt, teld di roosevelt. i think there's a sense when the problems change the president that you look back to changes as well. otherwise, we historians would be useful if we didn't help other know what i mean
is it that they tend to go sour. >> lyndon johnson didn't even make it to the second term. he had to resign because of vietnam. ever since roosevelt and the amendment that limited his terms, presidents tend to run out of steam and maybe even get tripped up by scandal in these second terms. i think it's kind of a natural reaction to the fact that power is moving on beyond these presidents because, in fact, they are lame ducks. the obama white house has studied this very, very closely. they know the perils of the second term. they think they can avoid the worst pitfalls. first of all, they are saying there's no scandals on the horizon, but they say they can avoid the worst by having a focused agenda and moving fast. >> we'll see if they can. george, thank you very much. george will have a special inauguration edition of "this week" this morning. white house senior adviser david plouffe is on the show plus a special guest, eva longoria. >> ah, stay with abc news and "gma" for continuing coverage of inauguration 2013. we'll be live tomorrow beginning at 7:00 a.m. with george and josh elliott co-anchori
the civil rights act of 1964. it took lyndon johnson to probably send it forward. he overcame what seems to be an unshakable logjam. in short, in our lifetimes, we have served enough nontrivial policy changes to recognize the inherent iron grip of status quo forces can be shattered and policy can progress. in the next few weeks, we can anticipate and hope that the debate over the regulation of guns and the balance between individual rights and civic obligation will command sustained into serious attention from our political leadership. advocates will mobilize as lobbyists plied their cases. in this unruly mix, universities like ours can and will discharge a critical role in providing principled scaffolding for this debate. here at johns hopkins, our scholars have been investigating the public health effects of gun violence for well over two decades. for the past 17 years, the center for gun aussie and research, envisaged by our colleague, has provided a home for that study areas producing nationally recognized research and recommendations aimed at understanding and curtailing the impact
kennedy in 1961. george h. w. bush in 1989. lyndon johnson in 1965. from 1977 jimmy carter and wrap up with george w. bush's speech from 2001. see ten inauguration speeches from ten past presidents. starting at 8:00 p.m. on c-span. requiring congress to act intestified working around the legislative body. speaking at the briefings hosted by the christian science monitor. he said he's hopeful not confident about the perspective for a tax reform. and expressed a willing tons look at the medicare eligibility age in the context of deficit reduction. this is an hour. >> thank you for coming. welcome to our first breakfast of the new year. our guest is sander levin of michigan. this is the first visit with the group. we welcome him. he's a detroit native learned bachelor of degree in chicago. elected michigan state senate. he was assistant administrator to agency for international development. he was elected to the house in 1982. four years after his brother karl elected to the senate. in march 2010, he won the gavel as chairman of the means committee. thus ended biographical portion of the
-- lyndon johnson filed it once in his six years. i filed it 390 some odd times. so we've got to change that. if you invoke that on a piece of legislation, people get 30 hours to sit around and do nothing. i want to get rid of that. i think we should not have the 30-hours post. and i think that we have to make sure that on a regular piece of legislation, if somebody wants to continue objecting to it after it's been invoked they should have to stand and talk. there should be a talking filibuster. >> okay. so there's -- can you explain this 30-hour thing? i think that -- in the grand scheme of things is the most egregious which is, you know, filibustering the motion to proceed and then, there's this weird kind of period after you filibuster with motion to proceed where it's mandated no one can do anything? >> well, there are two familiar low periods. first is when eye file the 16 senators file a motion that moves towards kloture and that's two full working days and then you have the vote and if you achieve, you're cutting off debate, then there's a 30-hour period that follows after that. and t
control act, one of the last pieces of legislation assigned by lyndon baines johnson gives the president of the united states of america the authority to ban importation into the u.s. weapons that are not needed for the military or suitable for sport. stuart: that is legit? judge napolitano: hear me out. the president can use his judgment as to what is not suitable for sport. if he abuses that judgment, so as to curtail weapons for self-defense by saying you can use them because they are not usable for sport, that would be the use of an executive order because he would tell the justice keep arming the treasury department not to let these things coming and the effect of it would interfere with self-defense. stuart: i am bored with it. i don't care about 1968. judge napolitano: the same authority president obama has. stuart: tell me your judgment, if the president uses an executive order to command, demand background checks universally is that are unconstitutional. judge napolitano: he does not have the authority to do that. because that is an interference with the free trade in interstate
lyndon johnson's legislative genius to process forward, beat back resistance and over, what seem to be an unshakable logjam. in short, in our lifetime we observed enough nontrivial policy change to recognize that the iron grip of static coal forces can be shattered and policy can progress. in the next few weeks we can anticipate and hope that the debate over the effect of regulation of guns and the appropriate balance between individual rights and civic obligations will command sustained and serious attention from our political leadership. advocates will mobilize as lobbyists apply to cases, and politicians will fight over the issues. we know that. and in this unruly mix, universities like ours can and will discharge a critical role providing principle holdings for this debate. here at johns hopkins, our scholars have been investigating the public health affects of gun violence for well over two decades. for the past 17 years, the center for gun policy and research, as visited by our colleague him has provided a home for the study, producing nationally recognized research and rec
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)